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Photo Paintings | Florencia Blanco Cutuk

Photo paintings, those images where costumes and backgrounds were painted over enlarged portraits, peppered my early childhood’s every day scenery. As I grew older, they slowly disappeared as precious objects of the working class, until I re-discovered them in a flea-market in 2000, where their subtle mysteries of lost ancestors and make-believe situations infatuated me with their purposeful yet fragile composites.

This popular technique from the Argentina of the mid XX century was a distinguished homage done by people of limited means to their deceased. Sometimes they were created as mementos of landmark celebrations such as First Communions and weddings. And other times they were hung on the walls to remember the relatives left behind in the Old Country.

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Zestful Arrangements of Food Methodically Placed in Accordance to Color

Methodically placing food in accordance to color, Emily Blincoe finds inspiration from shapes, colors, light, and everyday objects. Previously we admired The Garden Collection and Sugar Series, where Blincoe demonstrated her skill of arranging shrubbery and nostalgic candy in the same fashion. 

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Tags #Emily Blinco    #Art    #Food    #Photography   

The Clever Photographic Trick That Makes a Family’s Everyday Life Seem Magical

Family histories and memories are often formed through significant events: birthday parties, graduations, weddings. More often than not, however, the quieter, seemingly less significant moments resonate in our minds in a more profound way than any structured ceremony.

A few years ago, Charlotta María Hauksdóttir began looking for a way to capture the subtle, intimate moments families share in their homes and created a series about them, she titled “Moments.”

“I became interested to see how people were being shaped by their homes, creating their home and especially in regards to how children were growing up in the home and what memories they were creating,” she said. “I wasn’t interested in documenting a birthday but more just about how people live everyday.”

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People Called These Photos Of An Artist’s Daughter ‘Pornographic.’ And This Was His Response

Wyatt Neumann is a photographer and a father. In 2014 he took his two-year-old daughter Stella on a cross-country road trip, photographing their journey along the way. Neumann captured sunsets and cornfields and, of course, Stella, often donning one of most two-year-old girls’ two favorite ensembles: a princess dress and nothing at all.

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Neumann was determined, somehow, to turn all the hate directed his way into something beautiful. Rather than ignoring the criticism lodged against him, he created a new series in which he juxtaposed the hateful comments with the corresponding images he maintained were innocent. What he created was a photography show that presents both sides of the moral debate, allowing each visitor to interpret the images individually.

The title of the subsequent exhibition, “I FEEL SORRY FOR YOUR CHILDREN –- The Sexualization of Innocence in America,” was in part inspired by an online comment attached to one of Neumann’s works that read: “The whole thing is sickening and I FEEL SORRY FOR YOUR CHILDREN.” The exhibition examines the attacks launched against his photographs as well as what he sees as a segment of contemporary culture, thriving off shame and censorship, that incited such attacks.

"When I decided to do the show I was so upset and I was like, You know what? I think this is beautiful," Neumann continued. "I’m going to show these to the world the way that I saw them when I took them. I’m going to put them in beautiful frames on beautiful walls in a beautiful gallery."

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Tags #Portrait    #Art    #Photography    #Wyatt Neumann    #Social Media   

Antonio Gomez Takes a Walk on Las Vegas’s Surreal Side

Mesmerizing GIFs Use Light and Motion to Visualize Sounds

Visual artists long have been inspired by music and sound—and vice versa. Themes and concepts from one often infuse the other; well known examples include Kandinsky’s Composition 8, inspired by a performance of Wagner’s Lohengrin, or Rachmaninoff’s 13 preludes, inspired by Böcklin’s Die Heimkehr. For Turkish artist Erdal Inci, a fascination with the physics of sound—how vibrations manifest as tone and timbre—informs his loops of undulating movement and light.

Using props like light wands, flags, boards, and even his own body, Inci cavorts through Istanbul’s public spaces to make short videos full of repeating motion. A metronome or music keeps his movement synchronized as he films with a fixed camera, allowing him to digitally clone and arrange himself into repeating visual waveforms that evoke the stuff of sound.

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Tags #Photography    #GIF    #Animation    #Art   

Parisian Rooftops | Michael Wolf

Tags #Michael Wolf    #Paris    #Architecture    #Design    #Art    #Landscape   

Photos of Multicolored Floral Arrangements Evoke Wiccan Spells

Photographed with multicolored filters on a black backdrop, these floral arrangements by Elizabeth Parks Kibbey wouldn’t look out of place as a centerpiece in your home. Take a closer look and you may notice that each of these arrangements are actually comprised of ingredients to botanical spells and potions used in practices of witchcraft. Book of Shadows is Amelia Bauer’s most recent series, exploring feminine rituals that date back to the Salem Witch trials.

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If You Try to Publish a Picture of this Statue in Denmark, You’d Better be Ready to Pay Up
One of Denmark’s most photographed attractions, a Little Mermaid statue, comes with a strange caveat: it can’t be photographed. Or rather, a photograph of it can’t be used in a publication of any sort, even for journalistic purposes, without a big fat invoice finding its way to your door.
You see, the family of sculptor Edvard Erikson, the man who created the iconic Little Mermaid statue, is known for being extremely protective and aggressive about the statue’s copyright. As a result, a number of Danish news and media outlets have received massive invoices for using a photo of the Little Mermaid, despite it being one of the country’s most viewed and photographed attractions.
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If You Try to Publish a Picture of this Statue in Denmark, You’d Better be Ready to Pay Up

One of Denmark’s most photographed attractions, a Little Mermaid statue, comes with a strange caveat: it can’t be photographed. Or rather, a photograph of it can’t be used in a publication of any sort, even for journalistic purposes, without a big fat invoice finding its way to your door.

You see, the family of sculptor Edvard Erikson, the man who created the iconic Little Mermaid statue, is known for being extremely protective and aggressive about the statue’s copyright. As a result, a number of Danish news and media outlets have received massive invoices for using a photo of the Little Mermaid, despite it being one of the country’s most viewed and photographed attractions.

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Tags #Photography    #Copyright    #Art    #Denmark    #Edvard Erikson   

The Inspiring Desks of Art World Stars

E. Brady Robinson was waiting to photograph staff members of the nonprofit arts organization CulturalDC for an assignment when she casually took a photo of one staffer’s workspace. She describes that moment as a “happy accident,” one that inspired an extensive journey to capture the spirit of the art world all along the East Coast. Her forthcoming book, Art Desks, collects 57 images of the workspaces of artists, curators, art dealers, critics, museum directors, and others from New York to Miami. “I wanted to create an archive of people who are making important contributions to art and culture,” she said. “I’m interested in the idea of the desk as portrait and the social experiment of navigating the art world.”        

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Tags #E. Brady Robinson    #Photography    #Art    #Interiors    #workspace   

Dreamlike Food Photography Creates Alternate Edible Worlds

Russian self-taught photographer Dina Belenko creates alluring still life images which she calls “photoillustrations”. Combining creative and well arranged compositions with photography and a little bit of photo manipulation skills, Belenko creates beautiful food photography starring various inanimate objects: food products, utensils and other props.

According to the photographer, “every object around us keeps our emotions, expectations, feelings”, thus photographing things and capturing their soul can be equated to making powerful human portraits. To create her daydream-like photographs, Belenko uses simple everyday materials: sugar cubes, coffee, paper cutouts, clay models, etc. To get more exquisite accessories, like dentistry or jewelry tools, she delves into old closets or visits flea markets.

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Tags #Dina Belenko    #Food    #Art    #Photography    #photoillustrations   

micdotcom:

A Black artist played dead by a Philly landmark — and the reaction is just what you’d expect

Last Saturday, a group of artists decided to stage a silent protest in front of the LOVE statue, an iconic Philly landmark. The group seized on what was perhaps the most gruesome detail from Michael Brown’s shooting death in Missouri: the fact that his body was left uncovered on the street in broad daylight for hours.

So Keith Wallace, an MFA acting student at the University of California and Philadelphia native, decided to pose as a dead body. Covered with blood, bullet holes and even police caution tape, Wallace lied down and stayed absolutely still for an hour — right in front of one of the busiest tourist attractions in the city. 

Tourist: “Something about this doesn’t feel right, guys.”

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JESUS FUCKING CHRIST THESE PEOPLE POSING SHOULD BE ASHAMED OF THEMSELVES, THIS IS REVOLTING, UGGGGHH

Tags #Art    #Black    #Michael Brown    #Philly    #race    #Fucking white people   

Redefining Smartphone Photography

This June, the exhibit “The Space Between: Redefining Public and Personal in Smartphone Photography” opened at the Center for Photography in Woodstock, New York. The show—which includes the work of Laura El-Tantawy, Henry Jacobson, Chip Litherland, Florence Oliver, Kerry Payne, Mark Peterson, Sofia Verzbolovskis and the collectives Echo/Sight and Tiny Collective—brings together photographers who have found innovative and effective ways to use smartphones in their artistic practice.

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Tags #Art    #Landscape    #Portrait    #iPhoneography    #Abstract   

Tony Hammond’s Wonderfully Minimalistic iPhone Photography

Tags #Tony Hammond    #Art    #Landscape    #Minimalist    #iPhoneography   

Kevin Saint Grey