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Parisian Rooftops | Michael Wolf

Tags #Michael Wolf    #Paris    #Architecture    #Design    #Art    #Landscape   

Munich Architecture | Nick Frank

Tags #Nick Frank    #Architecture    #Photography    #Design    #Munich   

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

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Tags #Robert Dawson    #Design    #Books    #Education    #Libraries    #Architecture   

44 Stunning Art Studios That Will Inspire You To Get Back To Work

Tags #Art    #Interiors    #Design    #Studio   

A Lifesize Dollhouse Built And Burned By Heather Benning

Tags #Heather Benning    #Design    #Art    #Dollhouse    #Architecture   

Dirty Freight Trucks Become Canvases for Beautifully Detailed Drawings

For well over 10 years, British artist Ben Long has created public art using only his hands. Fingers act as a paintbrush as he produces elaborate drawings on the rear shutters of dirty freight trucks. They transform these large vehicles into mobile works of art, and Long has appropriately named his on-going series The Great Traveling Art Exhibition.

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Tags #Ben Long    #Art    #Public Art    #Street Art    #Design   

Why Polaroid’s Cube Action Cam is Special

Shopping for an action camera is like shopping for adhesive bandages: you either buy Band-Aids … or you pick up something  called “Aid Plus Bandages” because they’re on sale. And when you bring them home, you just call them Band-Aids anyway.

The proverbial Band-Aid in the action cam market is GoPro, the unquestioned dominating power and perhaps the tastiest, too. There have been challengers but none have taken a particularly large share of the market.

It’s very likely that isn’t going to change, but Polaroid’s Cube — the latest new arrival to the action cam market for which pre-sales began Monday — is definitely the most interesting GoPro alternative to show up in years.

An early version of the Cube — then known as the much less interesting Polaroid C3 – first appeared at the Consumer Electronics Show back in January. Back then it was relatively uninteresting, a by-the-numbers action cam that happen to be cubical. And while the specs haven’t changed much in the intervening time, it got an extra megapixel (it now has six megapixels instead of five), the video was upgraded from 720p to 1080p, and the design got a nice facelift. Plus, the $100 price tag that’s been announced places it amongst the most affordable action cams.

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Tags #Polaroid    #Photography    #tech    #Design    #Action Cam   

ESA’s Disposable Space Camera Will Record and Transmit Its Own Death Upon Re-Entry

The European Space Agency has designed a disposable piece of equipment affectionately referred to as the Break Up Camera. As you could expect from the name, the sole purpose of the camera is to capture it’s own death.

How will it capture its own death though? With the help of a dedicated Infrared camera, hooked up to a storage device that will be contained in a ceramic-shielded Reentry SatCom.

After the agency’s ATV–5 (Automated Transfer Vehicle) resupply ship takes its final journey to the space station, it will then make its way back into Earth’s atmosphere, carrying this Break Up Camera in its belly. Once the ATV–5 vehicle breaks up upon entry, the SatCom will immediately begin the recording and transferring of footage from the onboard infrared camera – not an easy task when falling at over 15,000 miles per hour.

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Tags #European Space Agency    #Science    #Photography    #ESA    #Tech    #Design   

Serene Desolation: Hyper-Realistic Paintings by Rod Penner of Small Town America

Tags #Art    #Painting    #Hyperrealism    #Rod Penner    #Landscape    #Architecture    #Design   

Photographer Nora Luther Turns Scrumptious Recipes into Colorful Photos of Floating Ingredients

Tags #Nora Luther    #Art    #Photography    #Food    #Food Porn    #Design   

Solar Powered Charging Tables Installed in NYC’s Bryant Park

Tags #NYC    #Solar Power    #Tech    #Design    #New York City    #Bryant Park   

Kickstarter Brings Interchangeable Lenses to the Raspberry Pi Camera with Fun DIY Kit

Tags #Raspberry Pi    #Kickstarter    #Design    #Tech    #Photography    #Camera    #DIY   

Lomography Gives Its DIY Konstructor Camera a Flash-y Accessory Package, New Bundle

Tags #Lomography    #DIY    #Camera    #Design    #Konstructor   

Researchers Create World’s Fastest Camera, Captures Frames at 1/6th the Speed of Light
As part of a joint venture between the University of Tokyo and Keio University, researchers have developed a new type of high-speed camera technology called Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography (STAMP). And it’s about to blow any and all previous high-speed photography out of the water.
The hardware uses an optical shutter to capture consecutive frames at under one-trillionth of a second – exponentially faster than mechanical or electronic shutters are capable of. Granted, the resolution is a paltry 450px x 450x, it’s 1000x faster than anything out there now, capable of capturing events occurring as fast as 1/6th the speed of light.
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Researchers Create World’s Fastest Camera, Captures Frames at 1/6th the Speed of Light

As part of a joint venture between the University of Tokyo and Keio University, researchers have developed a new type of high-speed camera technology called Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography (STAMP). And it’s about to blow any and all previous high-speed photography out of the water.

The hardware uses an optical shutter to capture consecutive frames at under one-trillionth of a second – exponentially faster than mechanical or electronic shutters are capable of. Granted, the resolution is a paltry 450px x 450x, it’s 1000x faster than anything out there now, capable of capturing events occurring as fast as 1/6th the speed of light.

(Continue Reading)

Tags #Science    #Tech    #Design    #Photography    #Camera   

A Stroll Through Ireland’s Eerie Ghost Estates

From the mid-1990s through 2006, home prices in the Republic of Ireland increased steadily, fueled by a period of economic prosperity known as the Celtic Tiger. In 2008, the property bubble burst, and investors who’d built housing developments in remote rural areas found themselves unable to sell their properties or, in many cases, even finish their construction.

Valérie Anex, an Irish citizen who grew up in Switzerland, was in County Leitrim in 2010 when she first came across ghost estates—defined by the National Institute for Regional and Spatial Analysis as a development of 10 houses or more in which 50 percent or less of homes are occupied or completed. Anex was astonished to learn that ghost estates were common all around the country. “The house is an object full of very strong symbols,” she said via email. “It is inevitable that when people discover through my images the existence of these inhabited brand-new houses, they start to ask themselves: What has happened? What are the historical forces that lead to this absurd situation? How is it possible to construct houses if there aren’t any people willing to live in them? Where does this surplus come from? Why this waste of labor, resources and energy?”
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Tags #Photography    #Landscape    #Architecture    #Design    #Real Estate    #Ireland