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Life in North Dakota

In his series “Meadowlark”, Seattle based photographer Ian C. Bates photographs the serene landscape, the multitude of wildlife, and the rural way of life in North Dakota. With the oil industry slowly encroaching on it’s scenery, Bates works to document life in the state before the imminent invasion of oil pumpjacks, trucks, and trains. Bates’s images seem to portray an era that has since passed which foreshadows the fact that the lives he’s documenting will change in the near future. 

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Sebastião Salgado’s “Genesis”

Legendary social documentary photographer Sebastião Salgado has traveled to over 100 countries, published multiple books, exhibited internationally, won many awards and he’s also a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. His work, which examines communities and environments all around the world, is  self-assigned. Following his previous long-term series on global issues, “Workers” (1993) and “Migrations” (2000), “Genesis,” debuts in the United States tomorrow, September 19, at International Center of Photography (ICP). “The result of an eight-year worldwide survey, the exhibition draws together more than 200 spectacular black-and-white photographs of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes, and indigenous peoples—raising public awareness about the pressing issues of environment and climate change,” ICP said in a statement about the exhibition. 

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Tags #Black and White    #Nature    #Portrait    #Landscape    #Photography   

Like a ‘Bad Relationship:’ Young Photojournalist Amanda Mustard On Life in Cairo

Each image in Amanda Mustard‘s collection of photographs in Egypt is a vibrant journey into a single moment. At 21, Mustard packed up her life and moved to Cairo, a far cry from the Christmas tree farm in rural Pennsylvania where she was raised. Mustard has lived in Cairo for 3 years, facing possible danger and harassment daily, not only as a photojournalist but as a female. Drawn to Cairo by the inexpensive living (her rent was just $70 per month), she ended up staying because of the unending subject matter that existed alongside the time she needed to develop her skills as a photojournalist.

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Tags #Amanda Mustard    #Landscape    #Portrait    #Photojournalism    #Egypt    #Cairo   

rjcaputophotography:

Perfection

rjcaputophotography:

Perfection

rjcaputophotography:

The view wasn’t too shabby either. Just look at that skyline. Would you rather be anywhere else? I didn’t think so.

rjcaputophotography:

Last Sunday was the perfect day for the All-Star BBQ Cookout

Tags #Taste Talks    #Photography    #Food    #Brooklyn    #Landscape   

Connecting the Lines

German street photographer Siegfried Hansen has an interesting way of connecting the dots, with lines. His main focuses are not humans and faces, but rather graphic connections and formal relations, which tell the stories of coincidences in public areas.

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Close-Up Aerial Photos of Africa’s Last Elephants

Zakouma National Park in southern Chad is famous for its large, free roaming herds of elephants. This has made it a honeypot for poachers. From 2005 to 2010, demand for ivory has reduced the park’s elephant population from over 4,000 to about 450 individuals.

In a visit earlier this year, Kate Brooks took these beautiful aerial pictures of the park and its remaining elephants. Brooks is a war photographer who has spent most of her 17-year career documenting conflict in the Muslim world. She says it’s no stretch to compare the slaughter of African animals to the worst human conflicts. Her forthcoming documentary, The Last Animals, will describe the increasingly sophisticated war between conservationists and poachers over elephants, and many other African animals.

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Ethereal Views of Earth From Way Up High

While reading a Japanese guidebook about Bolivia in the mid-’90s, Asako Shimizu noticed a small black-and-white photograph of a salt flat with a seemingly endless horizon. The memory of the image stuck in her mind for 10 years until finally, in 2006, she was able to visit the South American country where, inspired by the image, she created the series “On Her Skin.” 

Shimizu went to the world’s largest salt flat, Salar de Uyuni, which covers more than 4,000 square miles and is roughly 12,000 feet above sea level. If you have friends who have visited, chances are your Facebook timeline has been filled with trippy photographs that play off the optical illusion of people balancing on odd objects or holding a mini version of fellow travelers in the palm of their hands. 

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Tags #Asako Shimizu    #Landscape    #Nature    #Art    #Photography    #Bolivia   

Visit England’s Strange Border With Scotland

Tags #Scotland    #England    #Landscape    #Photography    #Portrait   

The Sex Offenders of Miracle Village

In a secluded area of Florida outside the Everglades there is a small community of 200 inhabitants isolated by surrounding sugar cane fields. In this self-governed neighborhood named Miracle Village, it’s residents have one thing in common… they are registered sex offenders. Photographer Noah Rabinowitz was able to document and capture the daily lives of the people who call Miracle Village home and the tight nit community that they have created. Rabinowitz explains, “Due to the strict laws dictating where they can live once their prison time has been served, this community has made the choice to instead live together, self-govern and try to build a normal life, deep in an isolated sea of sugar cane fields. They hope to create a model of post-prison life for sex offenders that can be exported to other areas around the country”. 

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Rob Stothard at the Scottish Border

Rob Stothard is a London-based photographer whose work has focussed on contested borders in Israel, Egypt, and Ukraine. Recently, he stayed closer to home, photographing Scottish towns near the border with England. There will be a referendum on independence in Scotland this Thursday, and recent polls show that the vote is too close to call. (John Cassidy has answered ten questions about the referendum.)

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Quiet, Haunting Photos of Vanishing Villages in China’s Rural Countryside

In his project The Degradation of Villages, Chinese photographer Wang Yuanling gives us a glimpse into a vanishing world. China’s near miraculous economic transformation has resulted in the largest internal migration in human history. As over 160 million Chinese, many of them young people, left their rural villages for the booming urban centers and the promise of a better life, the aging and the elderly were left behind in forgotten areas. Wang’s project focuses on just one of these places, a village in the Daba Mountains of remote Sichuan province.

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Tags #Landscape    #Photography    #Documentary    #Portrait    #China    #Wang Yuanling   

Savoring the Light in Iceland | Becky Harlan

As summer draws to a close, I hear my friends and family lament its passing. The days of warm skin and noisy crickets run out too fast. Usually I want to remind them that they knew this was coming. That maybe they should have taken that camping trip or at least spent a few lunch breaks outside. But I also remember that the reason they appreciate summer so much is that it doesn’t last.

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Tags #Photography    #Iceland    #Portrait    #Documentary    #Landscape   

A Quiet Day in Wonderland by Nikita Gill